What is intellectual property?
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What is intellectual property?


This is one in a series of videos about intellectual property and you! As you sweep across our magnificent nation, you’ll see that IP is all around us – it’s everywhere! IP is the output of innovation, new products and technologies that are protected so that they can thrive in the marketplace. IP rights offer not only protection, but can also drive commercial success for small, medium and large enterprises. Innovation moves fast! Canada is very competitive in highly innovative industries such as clean tech, advanced manufacturing, digital tech, health/bio-sciences, clean resources and agri-food. Let’s have a closer look… Patents protect new, useful and non-obvious products, compositions, machines, processes, or improvements on any of these. A patent will protect how a product works, what it does, how it does it, what it is made of and how it is made, for 20 years. Patents give you a competitive advantage in the market and demonstrate your commitment in protecting your innovation. Let’s keep moving! Trademarks protect a brand or company’s identity. Trademarks can be one or many words, sounds, shapes or designs such as logos, brand names, and slogans. Registered trademarks can boost investor confidence, build your reputation and become a revenue source through licensing or franchising. Moving on… Industrial designs are the features of a product that appeal to the eye. Original industrial designs can be protected for up to 15 years, and can help give products a competitive edge in the marketplace. All right – one more stop! Trade secrets can be very valuable when you have developed new technology, designed original products, created the perfect recipe, or have a gold mine of customer data. It gives you a business advantage over your competitor. To consider something a trade secret, you need to keep it secret! There’s even IP in the soundtrack of your life! Compositions and songs are protected by copyrights, as are original literary, artistic, dramatic, or musical works, such as performer’s performances, sound recordings and communication signals. The owner of the copyright has the sole right to produce and reproduce a work or a substantial part of it in any form. Once your patent is granted, or your trademark, industrial design or copyright registered by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office, IP rights can be used in court as evidence that you own the work. Everywhere you look from coast to coast to coast, IP is critically important! Find out more by visiting the Canadian Intellectual Property Office at this address!

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